Can I apply kerning to all fonts?

I’m sure there is a way to do it… But once I kern all of my pairs (especially WA, TA, etc.), is there a way I can copy all of that work to other fonts? I have a textured font that is the exact same as my regular, just with some texture done in Illustrator.

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Yes. In kerning window, you can select all pairs, copy, and paste them elsewhere. Before you do that, you need to make sure that source and destination files have the same set of kerning groups. There is a script for copying kerning groups, available at Mekkablue’s Github repository (Metrics > Steal kerning groups from font)

Or you can just “Import” the kerning groups from another file. Select all glyphs in font view, File menu > Import > Metrics…

Ah, I didn’t know that!

Hmmm once I import metrics, which file do I select? Do I select one of the OTF files? Those are greyed out, and when I select the Glyphs file, nothing happens.

Use a UFO file.

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Just import the classes from another .glyphs file. Make sure that you select all glyphs before you import classes.

Loving this thread. Have a question that is at least somewhat related.

I am making separate swash fonts for users who do not have access to a glyphs panel. These swashes will, ideally, seamlessly match up with the full font version. I have kerned these swashes in the full version of my font and they work great, but I’m, again, wanting to pull them out for use in a separate swash font.

The issue is that I will rename the glyphs in the new swash font so that when a user types “a” they get a swash… and so on.

My question. How do I keep the kerning I applied previously if I’m renaming the glyphs? Totally impossible? Or is there a better way to do this? Much thanks!

You need to have source and destination files open, and in the latter where you want to copy kerning data to, select glyphs that you want to make change and then choose Import Metrics menu. If you want to copy the entire kerning, select all glyphs.

When you rename a glyph, kerning data is also updated.

To keep the kerning of your smashes, you don’t pull them out of your font and don’t rename them. Use Custom Parameters in an extra instance to switch the glyphs on export. It is explained in this tutorial: https://www.glyphsapp.com/tutorials/alternating-glyph-shapes-with-multiple-axes

Ah this worked for me! It did a good job kerning the other fonts to match. Except, it for some reason gives me a slightly inconsistent kerning on each letter. It’s like it worked 95% of the way, and just gave up. any clue how to fix this? Images here: https://www.dropbox.com/sh/aeir29lk24j0wd3/AAC4kn1eJyJvOplV4nNd35cza?dl=0

I need more info what you actually did to answer that.

Hey George! Let me be more specific. I kerned my font “Condensed” to my liking. I then went about copying and pasting my two other fonts “Condensed Grunge 1” & “Condensed Grunge 2” the same way I pasted “condensed”, from Adobe Illustrator to Glyphs (tutorial: http://www.hellobrio.com/blog/font-tutorial). I then exported “Condensed” as a UFO like Dunwich recommended. I selected all the glyphs in “Condensed Grunge 1” and went to file–import–metrics–checked both kerning fields. Likewise for “Condensed Grunge 2”. But for some odd reason, the kerning is just a tad different between all three fonts (image: https://www.dropbox.com/s/811zt1k0wdir8wt/Screen%20Shot%202015-07-02%20at%201.05.13%20PM.png?dl=0).

Maybe there isn’t a quick fix to this. Is there a way I can do mass adjustments for the fonts? For example, in Adobe Illustrator, when I turn the tracking down about 15 -20 points on the grunge fonts, they look perfect! Is there a way I can select all the glyphs of my “grunge fonts” and just bring the tracking in a tad? Ultimately I’d like the letter spacing to be exactly the same between all 3 of them, but I don’t really know how to go about adding code like some people are suggesting. I’m a total noob at this…

Did you import the kerning or spacing? You don’t need to export a .ufo. Just load the data from another .glyphs file.
Maybe it is easier to put all that in one file. That makes it easier to compare the spacing of the glyphs.

And you can adjust the spacing with the transform filter.