Preview window moves when trying to scroll

I recently had the opportunity to set up a two-screen workspace. I’ve set things up so the main Glyphs window displays on one monitor, and a large preview window takes up the secondary monitor.

However, when I try to click and drag to move the text in the preview window, it moves the entire window around. The expected behavior is for the window to remain stationary, and the text/glyphs scroll horizontally. This makes it hard to focus on the desired glyph.

This is not my main production machine, so there’s no hurry, but it would be wonderful to work with this setup. Specs are Glyphs 3.1 (3133) on an M1 iMac running the Ventura 13.0 beta. It’s totally possible that Ventura is the problem, but if that’s the case, better to know now rather than later.

Thank you for any advice!

There’s a context menu option for centering the current glyph. Does that help? Or one of the other preview options in the Window menu.

I did try toggling the centering option, but it didn’t make a difference with regard to the entire window moving via click and drag. I’ll experiment some more.

I looked into this more and I realized this is just how the preview panel works. (Just to be clear, I’m talking about the separate preview window, not the horizontal space at the bottom of the main window, which does let me drag the view horizontally.)

Is there a chance of adding scrollbars and zoom to the preview panels/windows? Right now it seems the zoom level is tied to the height of the window.

It would be fantastic to be able to zoom close in at check on micro details without needing to export → cmd+tab to Illustrator → zoom in → cmd+tab to Glyphs → repeat.

Thank you!

The problem with zooming is what the size of the zoomable area and the potion of what you might like to see, changes when you switch to a different glyph/master in the edit view.

How would you like to use the zoom. What do you like to see bigger?

That makes sense, thank you for the explanation @GeorgSeifert.

The things I’d like to zoom in on are rounded corners, ink traps, and especially fine details in kanji. Right now I’m working on a Japanese font with rounded corners, and I like to zoom way in to make sure the details look good and the rounded edges aren’t behaving badly when the stroke isn’t perfectly horizontal or vertical.